South Coast Shopper

62706 Hwy 101 S
P.O. Box 1440
Coos Bay, OR 97420

Monday - Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm

Find a Shopper
Jan 10, 2019 Edition
The South Coast Shopper distributes 18,000 copies each week to over 600 locations on the Southern Oregon Coast. Shoppers can be found from Florence to Brookings and inland to the I-5 corridor.
Home Find a Shopper Place Your Ad
Close

South Coast Shopper Online Ad Order Forms

Classified Ad deadline is every Tuesday at noon for Thursday's edition.


Please choose the sales person you normally place your classified ads with & Your ad submission will go directly to them:
Looking to Place a Display Ad?
Contact our Display Sales Reps To Request For Proposal:
Ad Rates/Info Automotive Cities Community Employment Home & Garden Misc Abbreviations ContactAbout Print Edition

Out Our Back Door

    Langlois Area Has Lots of Potential for Outdoor Fun

    01/17/2019

    Read More
    PHOTO CAPTION: A visitor to the New River area north of Langlois readies a picnic lunch at a table next to the river.

    It's the days in between rainstorms that we've been getting some really beautiful weather here on the South Coast. It's not even this nice in summertime. In summer it's usually foggy in the morning, and when the fog burns off the north wind kicks in. Then the fog rolls back in at the end of the day.
    Spring can bring bright sunshine, but it's usually accompanied by a particularly chill wind. Autumn has some of the nicest weather, but here it is winter now and we're getting these pleasant interludes. The days dawn bright, clear and most importantly windless, and stay that way all day long!
    I thought it would be interesting to go someplace where it's almost always windy, just to see what it's like during calm weather. So I made my way to what's considered one of the most consistently windy places on the South Coast: Floras Lake, near Langlois. So reliable is the wind, in fact, that Floras Lake is one of the state's popular places for windsurfing and kiteboarding. There's even a windsurfing resort adjacent to the lake. And if further evidence is needed, just look at all the tortuously wind-sculpted shore pines and clumps of stunted brush. Brutal!
    So why's it so windy out here? Geography. Oregon's South Coast bulges out a bit at Cape Blanco, and it's this exposed headland and its surrounding coastal plain that hold the dubious distinction of being one of the coast's windiest places.
    The community of Langlois lies inland enough to escape the wind's full force, however, and it's a jumping-off point for some fun recreational opportunities and driving tours. About 4 miles north is the Bureau of Land Management 1200-acre New River nature preserve, with 4 miles of hiking trails, sand dunes and beachgrass-covered dunes, shore pine forest, wetlands, meadows, estuaries and a showcase of coastal foliage. Birdlife abounds, as this is a well-established resting area on the great Pacific Flyway, and there's lots of waterfowl both migratory and resident.
    Here, too, is the unique north-running New River. Local lore says that during the great flood of 1890, water raged into these lowlands. The storm carved out a new northbound channel from the usually docile Foremile Creek. A local rancher took a look and supposedly exclaimed, "It's a new river!" and the name stuck.
    About 4 miles south of Langlois is Cape Blanco State Park, with a year round campground, day-use area and trails for hikers and equestrians. There are nice beaches on either side of the cape. The Sixes River – a federally designated Wild & Scenic River – runs through the north side and the fabled Elk River – another wild river – is just south.
    There are tours year round of Cape Blanco Lighthouse, oldest operating light on the Oregon coast, and although it's closed right now for the season, the Hughes House is a Victorian-inspired home of early settlers that can be toured April to October.
    Closer at hand to Langlois – and adjacent to Floras Lake – is Boice-Cope County Park, open year round to accommodate windsurfers and others who come here specifically for the breezy conditions. Floras Lake is one of the sources of New River – this is its southern end – with a good launching spot for paddlers.
    From the park there are hiking trails to the beach as well as to Blacklock Point, an undeveloped state park.
    Driving tours in the Langlois vicinity range from paved roads up both the Sixes and Elk rivers, as well as a road up to Grassy Knob Wilderness, with a visit to a former lookout among the highlights. In addition to fantastic scenery up the Elk River, you can tour a fish hatchery.
    In Langlois proper, just across from the general store, drive up Langlois Mountain Rd. for the closest thing to an airplane ride hereabouts. It twists immediately uphill, each turn revealing more of the coastal plain, with views north to Cape Arago and south to Cape Blanco.
    So although it may not leap immediately to mind, Langlois is the gateway to lots of outdoor fun. Even if it's windy!
    Getting There
    From points north of Langlois, go south on US 101 about 15 miles south of Bandon. It's about 10 miles north of Port Orford on US 101. The New River area is about 4 miles north on US 101, (about 7 miles south of Bandon.)

    (Shopper columnist Tom Baake is author of regional guidebooks. Buy the books at local bookstores or at www.scod.com/guidebooks.)
    Riley Ranch Offers Lots of Recreation Opportunities
    Tom Baake
    01/10/2019

    Read More
    PHOTO CAPTION: A kayaker heads down a narrow arm of Butterfield Lake in Riley Ranch County Park near Hauser.

    Riley Ranch County Park near Hauser is fun destination any time of year, but you'll likely have it mostly to yourself during the off season. Despite many improvements and additions since the park's inception, it continues as a work in progress, with further refinements and attention to details.
    The park was largely intended to serve ATVers, with direct access into the Oregon Dunes for those staying in the campground as well as for day-use visitors. There are also rental cabins in the park.
    Hikers are welcome, although if they're headed out to the dunes, they have to use the same access road as ATVers. That isn't much of a problem this time of year, but it isn't as much fun in summer when there's more vehicle traffic. On a recent visit I saw only two dirt bikers, and I guess I was enough of a novelty – being on foot, that is – that they stopped to make sure I was okay.
    Indeed, the place sees so few riders this time of year that there were expanses of sand all smoothed over again for a new season. Like fresh powder at a ski area.
    Another highlight of Riley Ranch County Park is Butterfield Lake, its 20-acre little freshwater gem. Boating is restricted to electric motors or self-propelled vessels. It's regularly planted with trout by the Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, and anglers have also caught bass, perch, bluegills and crappie.
    Another nice thing is the apparent absence of the invasive aquatic plant called hydrilla that plagues most other Dunes Country lakes.
    On a recent visit, I launched a kayak from the boat ramp and headed south along the shoreline. For reasons not entirely clear, this stretch has a remarkable collection of what are best described as weird natural sculptures of old snags, stumps, big branches and weather-twisted trees.
    Passing a cove that held remnants of an old pump house, I followed the shoreline west toward an opening under a short railroad trestle. A narrow channel held plenty of water (this time of year) to slip into the west arms of the lake.
    Unseen from the rest of the lake, these arms are like wonderful compact fjords, with deep, dark water. They're framed by thick stands of wild rhododendrons, huckleberry and salal, with tall timber growing through the dense understory, and many ghostly old trees leaning at precarious angles. Some trees at water's edge have fallen completely horizontal, only to be propped up by their branches to remain quite alive.
    Because of all the logs and debris, access here and elsewhere in these narrow fjords may be completely or partially blocked. You may be able to "bump through" but don't get trapped!
    The arm to the north goes about two-tenths of a mile. Here is yet another remarkable phenomenon: Submerged logs floating horizontally have turned into miniature nurseries supporting bonsai-sized representative samples of the surrounding forest – tiny rhodie, huckleberry and salal plants, even mosses and glowing-green lichen.
    To the south another quarter-mile stretch of lake was tempting albeit challenging thanks to many floating logs. The views really opened up, with big expanses of sand dunes and the many seasonal and permanent lakes sparkling in the sun.
    Back in the main body of the lake, it was fun completing my leisurely circumnavigation, checking out the lake's eastern arm and its source-stream inlet. Along one section, chipmunks have created an elaborate system of trails and hideouts in the roots of brush clinging to cliffs above the lake. They ran back and forth chirping nervously, which made me laugh, which made them even more nervous.
    And so I eventually drifted away . . . and paddled back to the boat ramp, and made an easy landing. Still nobody here! You gotta love the off season, I guess.
    Getting There
    To get to Riley Ranch County Park from the North Bend/Coos Bay area, go north on US 101 about 6 miles to the park entrance, near milepost 227. There are fees for camping and ATV access but no charge for use of Butterfield Lake or for parking.
    (Shopper columnist Tom Baake is author of regional guidebooks. Buy the books at local bookstores or at www.scod.com/guidebooks.)
    Safely Enjoy the Beaches At Seven Devils Rec Site
    Tom Baake
    01/03/2019

    Read More
    PHOTO CAPTION: Patterns in the sand remain and interesting geology is revealed when the tide pulls back on the beaches at Seven Devils State Recreation Site between Coos Bay and Bandon.
    Visitors to the north end of Sacchi beach at Seven Devils State Recreation Site often remark about the resemblance of the shoreline here to the dramatic rocky cliffs at Shore Acres. It's not surprising, since it's all part of the same geological formation that's been uplifted and exposed at Sunset Beach, Shore Acres and Cape Arago. It's just that the outcrop at Seven Devils isn't connected by road or trail to its better-known counterparts, and driving (and then walking) from one place to the other takes time. But as the crow flies, the places are only a few miles apart.
    A visit to any of the beaches at Seven Devils also takes careful attention to tide times, because among the tricky things about them is that at higher tides they're covered with water!
    But twice a day, "right on schedule" the tides roll back to expose interesting beaches and allow access to more places. Come around as the tide ebbs and you'll find a wide stretch of sand between the steep coastal bluffs and the surfline. But even at the lowest of tides you can often see evidence of the last high tide in glistening wrack-lines of seaweed, driftwood and debris, sometimes right at the base of the cliffs. Little puddles of last tide's leftover water way up on the beach provide further proof. This is definitely not somewhere you want to be at the height of high tide.
    Also potentially hazardous is rounding any point of land when the tide's coming in. At best, you could find yourself stranded on "the next stretch of beach" for hours, waiting for the tide to change, and at worst you could get wet or washed away.
    Fortunately, it's pretty easy to time a visit with the tides. Tidebooks showing times, tide heights and corrections for your location are available at visitor centers, hardware stores and sporting goods shops. It's also easily found online, or with a number of handy apps. For further inducement, there will 13 minus tides this month, meaning lower-lows on certain days and more beach and tidepool exposure.
    If you happen to arrive at the height of high tide, just stay above the beach and enjoy the view. The tide will eventually ebb, making access possible again. Now all you have to watch for are sneaker waves, those random surges that can quickly flood the entire beach. The simple rule can't be stated enough: Don't turn your back on the ocean!
    These rules apply to all beaches, but seem particularly important at Seven Devils and nearby Whiskey Run, maybe because they're backed by steep bluffs with few escape routes from rising water. It may be this same compression of terrain, however, that makes these places so scenic.
    Getting There
    Seven Devils State Recreation Site can be reached several ways from both north and south. From Bandon, head north on US 101 about 3 miles and turn onto Seven Devils Rd., following signs to the beach, which is about 5 miles.
    From the south end of Coos Bay, go south on US 101 about 13 miles and turn right (W) on West Beaver Hill Rd., following it 1.6 miles to Whiskey Run Ln. Turn left and follow Whiskey Run Ln. downhill 2.5 miles to its intersection with Seven Devils Rd. Turn right (N) and go 2 miles to Seven Devils State Recreation Site.
    There are actually three connected beaches here, none of which are called Seven Devils. An interpretive sign explains they're named for pioneer settlers (Merchants and Sacchi beaches), physical attributes (Agate Beach), and a colorful historical incident (Whiskey Run.)
    The beach is front of the parking area is Merchants Beach. From here, it's possible to walk south about 1.3 miles to Five Mile Point. (There's a way around Five Mile Point for hikers on the Oregon Coast Trail, but that's a different story.)
    Meantime, from the parking area, the walk north on Merchants Beach comes to a headland at 0.5 mile. Do not round this or any other headland on an incoming tide. If safe tide-wise, continue north onto Agate Beach, which leads to another headland in 0.5 mile. Round that headland onto Sacchi Beach, which ends in 1 mile at the Shore-Acres lookalike bluffs (which are not only impassable but also private property.)
    When it's time, retrace your steps south, down Sacchi and then onto Agate toward Merchants. By the way, are there agates on this Agate Beach? Well, there may be sometimes, but I've never seen any. Like glass floats, though, agates can be elusive. Their "beds" are moved around by storms, often by miles. But it's storm season, so who knows? If nothing else, it's a good excuse for another visit sometime soon . . . and we've got plenty of beaches!

    (Shopper columnist Tom Baake is author of regional guidebooks. Buy the books at local bookstores or at www.scod.com/guidebooks.)

    Loop Hike Includes Beach, Forest, and the Hobbit Trail
    Tom Baake
    12/27/2018

    Read More
    PHOTO CAPTION: A sturdy new footbridge over China Creek is ready for hikers on the Valley Trail in Carl G. Washburne State Park.

    With the replacement of a storm-damaged footbridge, an interesting potential loop walk is again possible in Carl G. Washburne State Park north of Florence. The walk takes in a nice stretch of beach, a ramble through the woods along a soothing little creek, and the fabled Hobbit Trail. It could even include a loop within a loop to enjoy some fine old trees and surrounding forest.
    You don't necessarily have to make the whole loop, of course, and it can be approached from either direction. Sometimes I let the prevailing wind decide. That means doing the beach section with the wind at one's back and doing the forest section under the shelter of the trees.
    But after several trips over the years I've concluded that I enjoy the route to be described here, because the uphill section is more consolidated. Once past the uphill section, it's an easy downhill ramble the rest of the way. Take the time to do the whole thing, it's a classic of the Oregon coast.
    Getting There
    From Florence, head north on US 101. The highway rises dramatically from the coastal plain, offering immense views of the Pacific Ocean and Oregon Dunes. A few twists and turns takes you past the Sea Lion Caves, while the highway clings precipitously to plunging cliffs. Somewhere far below the sea churns and gnashes at the rocky shoreline.
    The highway will traverse Cape Creek Bridge, which along with the harrowing stretch leading up to it, was famously known as the Million Dollar Mile, as that was the unheard-of-for-its-time pricetag.
    Here too is Heceta Head Lighthouse, open for tours daily from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The keeper's quarters are now a bed and breakfast. It's actually only from below, in the parking area, that you can really appreciate the highway span designed by famed 1930s bridgebuilder C.B. McCullough. It resembles a Roman aqueduct, with a single parabolic arch that spans half its length.
    After a few more deep curves, the highway tops out and arrows down through another coastal plain. At about 12 miles from Florence, turn left (W) into the Carl G. Washburne State Park day-use area. Admission is free. After removing valuables and securing your vehicle, walk down to the beach and go south. According to a number of reference sources and state agencies, this is Roosevelt Beach, thought to stem from the days when US 101 was called the Roosevelt Military Highway. The beach can be inundated at higher tides, so time your visit to outgoing or lower tide times and always be on the lookout for sneaker waves.
    There are four small seasonal seeps and creeks to ford along the way. The beach itself is nicely framed by an unbroken band of coastal forest, with mighty Heceta Head looming directly to the south. Gulls squawk and wheel around while shorebirds browse the foamline, rising in a blurry mass only to land a few hundred yards down the beach.
    At about 1.2 miles is the "beach end" of the Hobbit Trail, near emergency sign #93, with campfire rings and other use. Head up the trail, so well-traveled it's worn down into a trench. This is the famous Hobbit Trail, which for reasons not entirely clear in years gone by was so named and subsequently festooned with shells, driftwood, flotsam, ornaments, and other artful additions. Nowadays only bits and pieces remain, mostly shells and such.
    The trail continues uphill, passing beneath spruce trees with their mazes of exposed roots and octopus arms. The trail switchbacks up some more, topping at about 1.5 miles and intersecting the Oregon Coast Trail, and then US 101. Carefully cross the highway and follow the well-signed Valley Trail north as it eases downhill through a mixed-species forest and dense understory of salal, huckleberry and rhododendrons. You'll cross the aforementioned footbridge over China Creek at about 1.9 miles, with an adjacent meadow overlook.
    Uphill briefly, then easing downhill again, with the creek bubbling alongside, the trail comes to a "T" intersection with the China Creek Loop at 2.5 miles. Definitely do take this short quarter-mile loop detour, with impressive trees your reward. It meets back with the main Valley Trail and continues north toward the campground, arriving at a bit over 3 miles.
    Head west on the access road, carefully cross US 101, and follow the asphalt trail through the shorepines and spruce to the day-use area parking lot, where this trek began. And wonder where the Hobbits went . . .

    (Shopper columnist Tom Baake is author of regional guidebooks. Buy the books at local bookstores or at www.scod.com/guidebooks.)
    Fun Doesn't Stop at Border

    12/20/2018

    Read More
    PHOTO CAPTION: Lake Earl Wildlife Area is part of Tolowa Dunes State Park near Crescent City, Calif.
    Surrounded by so much scenic beauty here on the South Coast, it's easy to overlook the vast recreational wonderland just across the California border in Del Norte County.
    Best known for impressive redwood groves, there's also a spectacular ocean shoreline, along with creeks, rivers, lakes, estuaries, even California's largest coastal lagoon. Dozens of miles of hiking trails and dozens more miles of waterways await hikers and paddlers, and even if you're not a birdwatcher or duck hunter, you might be impressed by the sheer number of birds and waterfowl. Other hunting and angling opportunities abound.
    The area also holds a deep tribal heritage, with increased efforts in recent years to preserve archaeologically-important places and other sacred sites.
    Even at the height of tourist season there aren't exactly throngs, and this time of year you'll share many places with only a handful of others, if any. And since this is all within a cool, rainy-not-snowy maritime climate, you can enjoy most of these places year round.
    Another thing to consider is that we here on Oregon's South Coast are actually closer to the redwoods and other Del Norte County destinations than most Californians. We can get to these great places in just a couple of hours!
    A centerpiece is Tolowa Dunes State Park, which like Redwood National and State Parks, consists of several "units," some close-in to Crescent City and others out of town. Lake Earl and Lake Tolowa – attached by a channel – are within the state park, and offer many hours of potential fun.
    Point St. George is another area of outstanding scenery, as well as an important tribal heritage area. It's characterized by coastal prairies and rolling, beachgrass-covered headlands, with the ocean putting on a mesmerizing show of spray and foam as waves surge against the rocky outcrops.
    As for beaches, there are long and short stretches, some starting right in town and another called Endert's Beach south of town where you can backpack in and camp for the night.
    As might be deduced, the recreational fun abounds "south of the border," so consider checking it out one of these days soon.
    Getting There
    US 101 is "Main Street" of the Oregon coast, and it rolls out of the state a bit south of Brookings. Crescent City is about 23 miles. Just before the border, visitors can stop for information, maps and brochures at the Bookings Welcome Center at the Crissey Field State Recreation Site. There are also several hiking trails and potential loops, as well as a nice beach.
    After a stop at the California agricultural inspection station, the highway continues to arrow south across a wide, flat coastal plain of fields, pastures, private residences and a scattering of businesses, including a thriving lily bulb industry. The settlement of Smith River offers some of the first recreational opportunities, with access to the mouth of the Smith River for boaters, anglers and paddlers.
    There are several ways to approach Crescent City from the north, but for this trip stay on US 101 as it arrives at a short section of freeway. Now we're really in California!
    One of the first exits connects to state Highway 199, which leads to Stout Grove, one of the prizes of the Redwood National Forest. (There's another way to the grove from Crescent City.)
    Meantime, the freeway gives way to a standard roadway as it arrives at the Crescent City outskirts.
    To get to the Lake Earl Wildlife Area in Tolowa Dunes State Park, from the intersection of US 101 and Northcrest Dr. at the north end of Crescent City, go north on Northcrest Dr. for 1.4 miles and turn left (W) on Old Mill Rd. and follow it 3 miles to the Lake Earl Wildlife Area. There are trailheads here, or continue to other trailheads at the end of the gravel road. The continuation of Old Mill Rd., closed to vehicles and called the Peninsula trail, is fun on a mountain bike. Here and elsewhere in the park are horse trails.
    Northcrest Drive also leads to a Lake Earl launch site. From the aforementioned intersection of US 101 and Northcrest Dr., go north on Northcrest Dr. It becomes Lake Earl Drive at about 2 miles. At about 4 miles turn left (W) on Lakeview Dr. and go 0.7 mile to the lake's edge.
    To find other places, continue on US 101 to the south end of town to the Redwood National Park visitor center, where there are maps, brochures and other helpful information for your exploration and enjoyment of this splendid area not far "out our back door."

    (Shopper columnist Tom Baake is author of regional guidebooks available at bookstores, the Coos Bay Visitor Center, and here at www.scod.com/guidebooks. They make great gifts!)
    Rough Road to the Beach
    Tom Baake
    12/13/2018

    Read More
    Photo Caption: A visitor to the beach at the end of Sparrow Park Road contemplates a vast spread of driftwood around the outlet of Three Mile Creek.

    Although you'd never know as you pass it along US 101 north of Gardiner, Sparrow Park Road offers access to an intriguing part of the Oregon Dunes – not to mention a long and wide beach. It's also one of the few free-access places in the Dunes; there's a $5 fee just about everywhere else.
    But a price of a different sort is exacted for this unique way to the beach. Consider it a sort of toll on the people and their vehicles that must be paid on both the way in and the way out.
    And what is this unusual admission and exit fee?
    Potholes.
    I've never heard the technical explanation for why this road has such a remarkable collection of them, nor for what happens to all the gravel that's been poured onto them over the decades. Back in the days when this area was regularly logged, it was easy to blame log trucks, but now that it's all just quiet, growing-back reprod forest, there isn't much heavy truck traffic.
    So why so many potholes? There just are, I'm told. Apparently there are enough recreational users and beach visitors that the road continues to get a workout and the potholes flourish. High-clearance vehicles are highly recommended.
    But it's only 3.7 miles and the scenery is interesting and there's a nice beach at the end. Call it a reward for your perseverance.
    Getting There
    From the intersection of US 101 and Highway 38 in Reedsport, go north on US 101, passing through the settlement of Gardiner in 2 miles. The highway rises from the coastal plain. Two miles from Gardiner turn left (west) onto gravel Sparrow Park Road. Views open up on the river, forests and ocean.
    The road – not too bad at first -- swings north, then descends into deeper woods of fir, cedar, hemlock, spruce and pine. About 1.5 miles along is a clearing of exposed sandstone, with some adjacent small draws or canyons used by target shooters.
    The road continues west, weaving through the woods and officially entering the Siuslaw National Forest. The puddles and potholes worsen. Also be alert on this one-lane road for vehicles coming at you at various speeds.
    About 3.2 miles is the trail to Three Mile Lake. (You could add a detour to the lake on your way in or out. It's an easy hike of about 1 mile up, down and through some fine coastal forest to the 64-acre lake.)
    Around a few more corners is the beach, with a small parking area and a few signs. There are no restrooms or other facilities, including garbage service.
    Four-wheel-drive street-legal vehicles equipped with an orange safety flag are allowed on the beach.
    Just to the south is the outlet of Three Mile Creek, with a vast expanse of driftwood all sizes, from gigantic stumps to fire-scarred logs to torn-up old branches half-buried in the sand. Imagine the kind of stormy weather that produced all this chaos.
    From Three Mile Creek, it's about 0.75 mile south to the Clambed Sand Road, which provides vehicle access to the north bank of the Umpqua River. It's also possible to drive south on the beach about 5 miles to the Umpqua River's north jetty.
    To the north, up the beach, it's possible to drive a couple of miles before getting to vehicle closures around Tahkenitch Creek.
    As always, whether visiting for a stroll on the beach or for driving onto the sand, be mindful of the tides, since they can flood the entire beach, right up to the foredunes. And you're a long way from help out here. Which is also sort of its appeal. Indeed, this is the real, wild, rugged Oregon coast. Potholes and all.

    (Shopper columnist Tom Baake is author of the region's go-to guidebook, "Out Our Back Door," available at bookstores and the Coos Bay Visitor Center, or at www.scod.com/guidebooks.)
ad image
Get Office Directions

© South Coast Shopper 1982-2019
Independently Owned & Operated

Ad Order Information

Classified Ad deadline is every Tuesday at noon for Thursday's edition. You can have a maximum of 5 free classified ads per household each week, 15 words or less, PRIVATE PARTIES ONLY. There is a charge for additional classified ads, ads of 15 words or more, and other non-qualifying ads are subject to a charge. See Ad Guidelines and Rates. Garage Sales are a bit different than other classifieds. To prevent confusion they have their own Garage Sale Ad Submit Form, located on the main menu!

Ad Rates - Classified

CLASSIFIED ADS! - Rates are subject to change without notice . Up to 20 word ad $12.00*. Add 50¢ per word after 20 words. Ad is a paid ad when: ~ Any ad over 15 words. ~ Additional ads to the 5 free allowed per household in one week. ~ Businesses, Home/Farm businesses, plants, rentals, services, daycare, etc. ~ Wanted: Business, investments, jobs, real estate, items to repair for resale, recyclable - including scrap or items to scrap, roommates, antique, vintage, or collectible items, firearms or animals. ~ Personals, announcements, clubs, organizations, nonprofits (ask your salesperson for nonprofit discount), products, estate sales, flea markets, bazaars, business opportunities. ~ Some animals: Animal breeders regardless of animals selling price, livestock regardless of price, pets priced at $100 or more, animal ads without a price. ~ Wood: Firewood, all wood & wood products. ~ Building materials priced at more than $100. ~ Antiques, collections or vintage items listed with out a price, or worth $100 or more. ~ Entertainment: Timeshares, gift certificates, theater/show tickets, fundraisers, etc. ~ Ads running 5 times for the same type of item (example: 5 different autos, 5 different pieces of furniture, etc) for the same household - future related items will not qualify for free ads. ~Any ad with a web address in the ad *$12 fee Expires 4/30/19

Ad Rates - Free Ads

FREE ADS! Rates Subject to change without advance notice. 15 word ads for private parties are free: You may send up to five free ads per household per week for qualifying items to be placed in the South Coast Shopper's printed paper and online. Accepted Shopper Abbreviations can help you shorten your ad, listed here. Is this ad timely?** ~ $2 per ad, paid on Monday or Tuesday by noon, guarantees timely placement for classified ads in the upcoming issue. ~ Save Money with the Early Placement Discount: $1 per ad if paid on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday by 5pm, also guarantees timely placement for classified ads in the upcoming issue. We determine if your ad is a free or regular ad. *Like a Garage Sale, sporting items before hunting season, young puppies, etc.

Ad Rates - Photo Ads

PHOTO ADS! Rates Subject to change without advance notice. Free Ad Photo Special (for private parties): You may add a photo of your item to your free ad for only $5! (Advertised item must meet all free ad guidelines) Power Photo ad: You get a photo of your item, a large capitalized bold headline and up to 20 words for $19 per week, there is a $5 set up fee the first week. Additional words are 70¢ each.

Ad Rates - Other Extras

OTHER EXTRAS: Rates Subject to change without advance notice. Extra Large Bold Headline $3 Ad Centered $3 Extra Large Bold Headline & Centered Ad $5 Box around your ad $4 Color Print in your ad $4 Box Around & Color Print In $6 Power Ad: Extra Large Bold Headline, Centered and Box only $7 Power Theme Box: Theme Box, Centered and Bold Headline $10 Call or Submit Form before noon Tuesday to guarantee your free classified ads. To pay with your credit card, include the credit card number and the dollar amount for the ad. Note: There is a $4 minimum amount for credit card purchases. Call or Submit Form before noon Tuesday, or go to your salesperson's submit form, to place a $12.00* ad or any ad with other extras. (*$12 until 4/30/19. Reg rate $14.)

Ad Rates - Garage Sales

- Private Party*: Address, Day, Time: Free - Private Party needing more detail: Address, Day, Time + 7 words: $8 - Businesses, Flea Markets, Craft Sales, Estate Sales, Private Party needing additional words: Address, Day, Time +17 words: $12* - Additional words over 17: $.50/ea. *$12 Fee Expires 4/30/19

Bandon

101 Marketplace of Bandon ACE Hardware Highway Deli Mart Fast Mart Golder’s Bandon NAPA Auto Parts Laurel Grove Store LydiAnna’s Laundromat McKay’s Market Minute Café Ray’s Food Place Southern Coos Gen. Hosp. The Station Restaurant Wilson’s Market

Brookings/Harbor

Chevron Food Mart Circle K Dairy Queen McDonalds Rite Aid Sportshaven Restaurant The Hungry Clam Wild River Pizza

Coos Bay

7-Eleven Abby’s Legendary Pizza Angelina’s Mexican Restaurant Bay Area Hospital Bay Clinic Bayshore Chevron Bayway Market Bi-Mart Builders First Source Chevron Station/Car Wash Coos Bay Liquor Store Coos Bay Senior Center Englewood Market Fast Mart Farr’s True Value Hardware Fred Meyer Green Lightning Laundry Knecht’s Auto Parts Les Schwab Tire Center McDonald’s McKay’s Market Mini Pet Mart Napa Auto Parts Newmark Center North Bend Medical Center Safeway Salvation Army Thrift Store Shake ‘N’ Burger South Coast Shopper StockPot Restaurant Subway Tioga Lobby T.N.T. Market VP Racing Wendy’s CHARLESTON/EMPIRE 7-Eleven Barview Market BEEZ Smoke Shop Dairy Queen Davy Jones’ Locker Grocery Empire Mercantile General Store Grocery Outlet Lighthouse Market McKay’s Market Post Office Sunset Market William’s Bakery Outlet Store

Coquille

Carquest Truck & Auto Supply Colonial Mexican Restaurant Coos County Courthouse Coquille Broiler Coquille Liquor Store Coquille Produce Coquille Smoke Shop Coquille Supply Inc Coquille Valley Hospital Denny’s Pizza Devil’s Kitchen Fast Mart Frazier’s Bakery Highway Deli Mart McKay’s Market Milk-e-Way Feed & Trucking Oregon DMV Safeway Whoozit’s Whatsits

Drain

CG Market & Reel Pizza IGA Market Rose Garden

Elkton

Arlene’s Café General Store

Florence

37 Street Coin Laundry 7-Eleven A & W Drive In Abhi’s One Stop Market Bi-Mart Clawson’s Wheelhouse Restaurant Clea Wox Market Dairy Queen Fred Meyer St Vincent De Paul Stop ‘N’ Shop Twin Lakes Store

Gardiner

Gold Beach

Honey Bear Resort Indian Creek Cafe McKay’s Market NAPA Auto Parts Nesika Beach Market Wedderburn Store AGNESS: Cougar Lane Store

Hauser

Wagon Wheel Grocery

Lakeside

American Classics Diner City of Lakeside Hennick’s Lakeside Hardware McKay’s Market T’Ree Acres Wagon Wheel Grocery

Langlois

Langlois Store

Mapleton

Gingerbread Village Restaurant Mapleton Store

Myrtle Point

Ace Hardware Fast Mart Highway Deli Mart Kozy Kitchen McKay’s Market Myrtle Grove Naturals Myrtle Point Liquor Store The Feed Store

North Bend

7-Eleven A-1 Smoke Shop AMB Thrift Store American Home Furnishings Ashworth’s Market Bailey’s Health Food Store Bi-Mart Bungelow Market Chevron Station & Mart Coastal Highways Dishners Café Gino’s Pizza Glasgow Store Humboldt Club Kozy Kitchen Les Schwab Tire Center Lillie Family Market McDonald’s Fast Food Mom’s Kitchen Nex Dor and More North Bend Liquor Store North Bend Senior Center Pancake Mill Restaurant Perry’s Electric & Plumbing Pony Village Mall Quik E Mart Rite Aid Safeway Shell Gas Station & Mart South Coast Hospice Thrift Store Tai’s Dynasty Top Dog Coffee Umpqua Bank Vinnie’s Burgers Yeong’s Place

Port Orford

Circle K Ray’s Food Place TJ’s Coffee House

Powers

Cruiser Cafe Power’s Market Power’s Tavern AGNESS: Cougar Lane Store

Reedsport

7-Eleven Dairy Queen Don’s Diner & Ice Cream Parlor McDonald’s Fast Food McKay’s Market Recreation Station Safeway SMITH RIVER: Smith River Market

Remote

Bridge Store

Scottsburg

Riverbanks Speedy Mart

Wells Creek

Riverbanks Speedy Mart ELKTON Arlene’s Café General Store

Winchester Bay

Bedrock’s on the Bay Oregon Coast RV Resort Stockade Market & Tackle Shop Winchester Market Winchester Post Office

Abbreviations

Accepted Shopper Abbreviations  For consistency & clarity in the South Coast Shopper we use a set of standard classified ad abbreviations. They are listed here to help advertisers in writing their ads and readers in understanding the ads. (There is a fee for NOT abbreviating classified ads because our rates are based on these abbreviations)  UPDATE! We use abbreviations to save space in the paper, saving cost, that we pass on to our advertisers with lower classified rates than comparable papers across the Nation. A new way of naming products has developed that make product names unnecessarily longer. We will list these names in the traditional way to continue to save space in the paper, saving cost that we can continue to pass on to our advertisers. Examples: Ranger XLT by Ford would be abbreviated to: Ford Ranger XLT OceanRunner Rainbow Series by WildSeas would be abbreviated to: WildSeas Rainbow OceanRunner In the body of an ad always use numerals. Example: Newer 3bdr home. At the beginning of an ad spell out short numbers. (Example: Three bdr home.) As always, if you do not want your ad abbreviate we can use the longer version for $2. Miscellaneous: These apply to all classifications $ each — $/ea $ or trade — $/trade and — & approximately — approx best offer — b/o brand new — new board foot — bf #carat (gem stones) — #c (gem stones) CD or CD player — cd condition — cond excellent — exc electric — elec evenings — eves # of feet — #’ good — gd great — grt heavy duty — h/d home (after phone #) — home (after phone #) hours — hrs inches — #” #karat (gold) — #k (gold) large — lrg liner foot — lf make offer — m/o medium — med message — msg microwave — micro new in box — new or best offer — obo pints — pts plus — + possible — poss pounds — #lbs quarts — qts small — sm size — sz square foot — sf standard — std tongue & groove — t&g weekends — wknds wanted — want work (after phone #) — wk you haul — uhaul you move — umove Autos, Trucks, 4x4’s, Heavy Equip, Auto Misc. 2 wheel drive — 2wd 4 wheel drive or 4wd — 4x4 air conditioner or a/c — air all power options — all pwr all options — all opts all power — all pwr all terrain (tires) — AT all wheel drive — awd automatic — auto cassette — cass carburetor — carb CB or CB radio — cb CD or CD player — cd Chev, Chevrolet — Chevy Club cab — c-cab Cruise control — cc cubic inch — ci # cylinders — #cyl distribution (hitch) — dist # doors — #dr double — dbl engine — eng extended cab — x-cab extra cab — x-cab hatchback — h/b # horse power — #hp # horse — #hp # of hours — #hrs hydraulic — hyd International — Internat’l interior — int king cab — k-cab Limited Edition — Ltd Ed liter — ltr long bed — lb long wide box — lwb mag wheels — mags mud terrain (tires) — MT ##,000 miles — ##k miles — mi motorcycle — cycle motorhome — mh mount or mounted — mnt or mtd options — opts original — orig over drive — o/d # passengers — #pass pickup (if needed) — pu # pounds — #lbs power — pwr power brakes — pb power door locks — pdl power steering — ps power windows — pw power take off — pto quad cab — quad rebuilt — rblt short bed — sb # speed — #spd station wagon — sta wag or wagon T-Tops — t-tops take over payments — t.o.p. Thunderbird — T-Bird tilt steering wheel — tilt Ton, ton, 1 ton, ¾ ton, etc — t, t, 1t, ¾t, etc trailer — trlr transmission/tranny — trans weight (hitch) — wt wheels — whls NOTE: John Deere the company uses J.D. themselves, so “John Deere” and “J.D.” are acceptable RV’s, ATV’s/CYCLES, BOATS awning — awn fifth wheel — 5th whl fully self contained — fsc generator — gen motorhome — mh self contained — sc wheels — whls 4 wheeler — 4whlr, 3whlr four wheeler — 4whlr, 3whlr Harley Davidson — Harley HD — Harley aluminum — alum electric — elec Evinrude — Evin galvanized — galv # horse power — #hp # horse — #hp inboard — i/b inboard/outboard — i/o long shaft — ls Mercury (boats only) — Merc outboard — o/b outdrive — o/d short shaft — ss Animals # months old — #mos # years old — #yrs puppies — pups spayed — spay neutered — neut female — fm male — m up to date — utd Appliances/Furniture box spring — box California — Cal capacity — cap entertainment — ent queen — qu refrigerator — fridge wooden — wood Electronics Gigabyte — gb Gigahertz — ghz Hewlett-Packard — HP high definition — hd high def — hd high def tv — hdtv Mega bytes — mb Megapixels — mp Nintendo — Nin Play Station — PS Play Station 2 — PS2 Play Station 3 — PS3 Play Station 4 — PS4 TV — tv VCR — vcr Windows 98 — Win98 Xbox 360 — Xbox360 Xbox One — XboxOne Employment experienced — exp’d hour — hr Full Time — F/T Part Time — P/T references — ref’s required — req’d week — wk year — yr Garage Sales Time example: — 8a-5p Days — Fri-Sun Dates (if needed) — 3rd-4th Highway — Hwy Roads — Rd, Ave, Blvd, St, etc… Multiple — Multi Real Estate, Mobiles, Rentals $00 per month — $00/mo $00 deposit — $00/dep # bathrooms — #ba # bedrooms — #bdr double — dbl double wide — dbl for sale by owner — FSBO manufactured — mfg mobilehome — mobile no drugs — n/d no pets — n/p no smoking — n/s owner may carry — omc owner will carry — owc single wide — single take over payments — t.o.p. washer/dryer hook-ups — w/d hk-ups water/sewer/garbage paid — w/s/g pd Sporting Goods Ammunition — Ammo Bicycle — Bike Camouflage — Camo magnum — mag mountain — mtn Remmington — Rem Winchester — Win Cities Bandon — bd Brookings/Harbor — b/h Charleston — charl Coos Bay — cb Coquille — cq Crescent City, CA — cc Drain/Elkton/Scottsburg — hwy38 Florence — fl Gardiner — gar Gold Beach — gb Hauser — hau Langlois — lg Lakeside — lksd Mapleton — ma Myrtle Point — mp North Bend — nb Port Orford — po Powers — pw Roseburg — rsbg Reedsport — rdspt Remote — rm Winchester Bay — wb NOTE On Cities: At the end of the phone number designating which general area the ad is from, the abbreviation will be lower case. In the body of an ad when the city is needed it will still be abbreviated, but it will be in caps. Some categories are now separated by location.

Automobiles

Employment

Home

Miscellaneous

Cars

Trucks

4X4s/SUVs

Vans

Classics

RVs

Boats

ATVs

Cycles

Heavy Equipment

Misc. Auto

Help Wanted

Work Wanted

Real Estate

DeEsta Kuehn

Classified Sales & Classified Manager

DeEsta Kuehn 22 years in the community, 20 years as a sales agent, and 19 years as the Classified Department Manager for The South Coast Shopper.

541-269-0310

deesta@scod.com

Katrina Smith

Classified Sales

Katrina Smith, a Coos County native, 2 years as a sales agent for the South Coast Shopper.

541-269-0310

katrina@scod.com

Amanda Palmer

Display Advertising Sales

Amanda has resided 10 years in the community, with 6 years sales and marketing experience.

541-269-0310

Amanda@scod.com

Sharon Ballard

Display Advertising Sales

Sharon has been a southern Oregon coast resident for 3 years with 20 years of experience in sales and marketing.

541-269-0310

sharon@scod.com

Britney Gordon

Office Manager & Bookkeeper

Britney Gordon, is a Coos County native, 1 year as Co-Office Manager, 10 years as Office Secretary for The South Coast Shopper, and has been Assistant Manager for the Classified Department for 3 years.

541-269-0310

hr@scod.com